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FAA LAANC Coming to Recreational sUAS

PatR

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Very good. More cause for recreational operators to develop understanding of the national airspace system. Those choosing to remain ignorant will limit their opportunities.
 
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Phaedrus

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True. Although I worry about model airplane pilots and how that will work. However, Section 349 does have a carve out for fixed sites and requires them to work out an arrangement with the applicable ATC facility. But by in large, I agree, this will force a lot of people to better integrate into the system. Assuming of course that they all follow the rules,
 
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So what does this mean for the average Joe such as myself that pops out a foldable drone every now and then?
 

Ty Pilot

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Eventually, to fly these aircraft even for hobby, those of us who operate them will have to become part of, or at least have a basic understanding of, the big picture that is; NAS - the National AirSpace. LAANC is actually a tool that will allow hobbyists and commercial operators the ability to fly in airspace that before was not possible or took a long time to get approval. So in that respect it is a good thing for those who work or like to fly in different locals.

So what does it mean to the average flyer? I don't think there is a simple answer because this is an ongoing and fluid process. Regulation is coming to the 'drone' world its just a matter of time until it effects all of us, from the commercial side down to someone who lives on a ranch 500 miles from no where.

I agree with what Pat said; we either see what is coming and this causes enough curiosity in us to want to see what 'IT' is all about and begin to take on the responsibility that comes with flying these things or - one doesn't and hopefully steers clear of problems in the future.
 
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That makes sense. What we need is readily available airspace maps or an app that actually works to identify restricted airspace in my opinion. I’m still learning to read airspace maps myself.
 
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Recreational pilots should have more stringent rules than certified 107's.
Most recreational drone pilots have not a clue about airspace compliance, nor the will to learn it.
 
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Ty Pilot

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That makes sense. What we need is readily available airspace maps or an app that actually works to identify restricted airspace in my opinion. I’m still learning to read airspace maps myself.
B4UFLY is getting completely reworked and should be of great benefit to the hobbyist as well as commercial users when completed.
 
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Phaedrus

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Moving forward recreational sUAS will:

  1. be limited to 400 feet agl in Class G airspace
  2. Require authorization in Class B, C, D, and E (surface) airspace - LAANC likely
  3. Have to pass a test
  4. Comply with Part 48 registration (Currently required).
  5. Comply with and operate under the Safety Program of a Community based Organization as authorized by the FAA.

Functionally the differences almost disappear between hobby and 107, especially with 107 going to waiverless night ops soon (how soon is up for discussion)
 
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PatR

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That makes sense. What we need is readily available airspace maps or an app that actually works to identify restricted airspace in my opinion. I’m still learning to read airspace maps myself.
The FAA has been providing that information, in map, book, and digital formats to the public for many, many years. When the FAA got connected to the web all that information was and is free to all that desire it. There are private companies that provide info subscription services for a fee.

So there’s never been a lack of available information but there has been, and still is, a lack of people participating in RC aerial activities demonstrating a desire to make use of the wealth information openly available to them.

This forum has, many, many, many times over, posted links to map and airspace information. It should not need to be force fed or delivered via an enema.
 
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PatR

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Simply scroll one or two threads down in the General forum to the thread titled B4UFly Question and become bewildered with the vast number of resources available to you and everyone else in the last post.
 
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