Hello Fellow Yuneec Pilot!
Join our free Yuneec community and remove this annoying banner!
Sign up

Post crash protocol

Joined
Jul 5, 2019
Messages
11
Reaction score
3
Age
49
Hi y'all.
I've crashed my typhoon q500 4k twice. Both times I've put the camera back together, calibrated it, the replaced the blades.

So far so good. However, I got to thinking maybe there is more i should do than that. Does anyone reset and recalibrate the S10 controller and drone back to factory settings then bind the drone again to the controller?
 

Steve Carr

Missed Approach
Staff member
Premium Pilot
Joined
Dec 15, 2015
Messages
6,958
Reaction score
3,358
Location
Bessemer, MI
Have you checked the sticks in Hardware Monitor?
Was there a problem with the controls that resulted in a crash?
 
Joined
Jul 5, 2019
Messages
11
Reaction score
3
Age
49
Steve Carr: both times I took my eye of the of the flight trajectory. My rotors nipped an object and then the whole thing came down. As far as I can tell, the system worked as advertised throughout all flights. Direct line of sight, responsive flight controls, continuous camera feed.

I'm not following you with 'Check the sticks in Hardware Monitor'...

WTFDProject: I calibrated my CG03 through the Windows 10 interface. I calibrated yesterday but haven't taken it on a test flight. I had to order new bushings for the gimbal, a new door closer, and new blades. In the last crash, the wires from the hull attachment ripped off, so now I use the wire harness. I think I like that better.

On a related note, I've found through these two crashes that the Typhoon q500 4K is a robust unit. I hope I don't have to replace any circuit boards in the future...

I will be more careful in the future. Both of these crashes were caused by hot dogging the flight path. The second one I just watched in admiration at the beauty and smoothness of flight my Tq5004k offers. I need to keep my mind on the task!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Steve Carr
Joined
Jul 6, 2018
Messages
955
Reaction score
610
Location
UK
'Post-crash protocol', for me at least, includes 3 main stages:

1. The things we can do in advance of any flights to make sure we can quickly find our craft if it goes down somewhere unobvious.
2. The things you do immediately after the accident when you find the craft.
3. The things you check about the craft once you have restored it to what you hope will be working order.

Stage 1 is covered for me with the addition of a small tracker. I use the loc8tor button tracker on mine, mounted on velcro just above the gimbal retention switch. I have never crashed my H, but before that I had a DJI-driven TBS Discovery Pro, and when that went down (NPE flight controller freakout), utterly invisibly in a cornfield, the tracker was able to lead me straight to it. It was such a vast field that I could have searched for days unguided and still not found it.

Typically, the things you should do at Stage 2 are related to making safe and crash investigation.
So that primarily involves disconnecting batteries / putting out any fire / making safe, then videoing the crash site and remains, complete with audio commentary in as much detail as you remember, something that is important we do asap after a crash so we don't forget anything that happened... if you have that and the telemetry from the flight the chances of finding out what went wrong are very good.

Whereas Stage 3 involves much more thorough than normal checks over the whole craft, and the hardware functions before first flight. I'm sure I don't need to tell anyone what those checks involve, and a lot of them can be done at home without any props on, but after that I do like to find a particularly empty field in the middle of nowhere to make the first flight tests after a crash, thereby minimizing consequences should anything still be wrong.
 

New Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
17,124
Messages
200,081
Members
19,807
Latest member
MDePhillips