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Typhoon H 5 Rotor Mode

Steve Carr

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I was thinking of posting that here, just didn't think I could do it outside of the pictures section. :)
It's not really just a normal video. With the slow motion added it shows how the H responds to a damaged motor. There are very few of those and perhaps none as vivid as this one. You did a fantastic job in getting the H back on the ground. If the H had been lower the outcome may have been different. Thanks so much for providing this footage Ron.
 
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PatR

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Great capture of an event that would have ended in disaster for any quad on the market. Many like to say motor failures are too rare to be concerned about. Although not true as motors and ESC’s do fail on their own, we can never predict when an outside influence might disable a motor, and having the ability to maintain control of the aircraft after such an event is a pretty big deal.
 
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DoomMeister

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That was awesome to see on video! Now I know my next craft will be a hex. Good to see what the 5-motor mode will do when the battery still has power to land the craft.
 

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That was awesome to see on video! Now I know my next craft will be a hex. Good to see what the 5-motor mode will do when the battery still has power to land the craft.
Any hex or octo with adequate reserve thrust (headroom) can safely fly after losing one or two motors. The H does not have much thrust headroom so they came up with the reversing motor concept to provide continued function in the event of a single motor loss. It works surprisingly well.
 
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Any hex or octo with adequate reserve thrust (headroom) can safely fly after losing one or two motors. The H does not have much thrust headroom so they came up with the reversing motor concept to provide continued function in the event of a single motor loss. It works surprisingly well.
Yea I'm looking at the formula for Fthrust very interesting.
 
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@PatR
So what do you mean by reversing motor concept. how does this work?
 
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Exactly why I bought my H. Many moons ago I had an ESC smoke in one of my Phantoms. It fell like a wobbling rock.
 

PatR

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Yea I'm looking at the formula for Fthrust very interesting.
To be adequate for an FC to compensate for a lost motor without a fancy algorithm to repeatedly reverse an opposing failed motor there needs to be enough battery capacity to deal with powering motors that can provide a minimum of 3X the demand normally required of them.

The formula for this is pretty simple. If you are designing an hex with an intended all up weight (AUW) of 5lb we need to divide the AUP by 6 to determine the amount of thrust necessary from each motor to just hover and double that number to provide for lift off and maneuvering. If there is to be any hope of the FC maintaining control during a motor failure that factor has to be increased to 3X or more with more preferable. I use a factor of 4. That “head room” factor is why octos are often chosen over a hex as each motor does not have to be capable of delivering as much reserve thrust as they have more power units to spread the load, plus an octo is easier to maneuver with a motor out. In fact, an octo will often allow flying out the rest of the mission with a motor out without significant effect on stability, something we don’t want to do with a hex. That’s due more to the demand placed in the FC when a motor is lost. Octos are not as efficient as a hex or quad though. There are always “trade offs” to be made for speed, lift, maneuverability, stability, and safety. For those desiring maneuverability, a Y6 can be pretty darn sporty, while an X8 is more maneuverable than a flat 8.

Design stuff gets kind of fun if you’re one that can get into that kind of thing. Researching components that meet your specs requires dedicated effort. Complicated but satisfyingly challenging.
 
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Well, that's an interesting and simple formula.
5/6= .8333 x 4 (your save guard) = (3.333 Fthrust per engine).
roughly 34% more Ft using factor of 4 than 3.
yep, more than adequate.
 

PatR

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Convert to grams to make the selection process easier as grams/thrust/prop diameter/volts is what makers use to rate their products. I haven’t dug deeply into it but I believe the H uses 800-900Kv motors, and using a 4s battery limits prop size and output quite a bit.
 
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I wouldn't mind building my own, but I have no clue when it comes to software and firmware, let alone programing.
 
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PatR

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About the easiest and most versatile FC that a neophyte can set up is an Eagle Tree Vector. They are very easy to set up and require little in the way of programming and even that is well described. It's well supported and the user/instruction manual is extremely comprehensive. About $200.00 or so but they can be found used in the area of $125.00--$150.00. You need to be pretty trusting of how others deal with sensitive electrical components to go that route though.
 
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I just looked up ETV on YT, this guy has a series on how to put this together. I'll spen the next few days watching and see how numb my brain gets before diving in. What structural hardware do you suggest?
I want to build one that will lift at least 10 to 15 pounds.
 

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Tarot or Foxtech, over 650mm but smaller than 1000mm. ET suggests the Vector was designed around smaller frames but I can state equivocally they handle an 810 with no adjustments out of the box as long as they are CG balanced and all the props are mounted level. Many have been built using a Vector. Go with a twin 6s power supply. Plenty of power and the Vector has voltage step down built in for video stuff. Hardest part is paying attention to the instructions...and getting started after looking at the pile of parts in front of you

The down side is you quickly learn why consumer drones became so popular. They cost less and most of the features you like and want are already integrated for you, even if they aren’t exactly what you would prefer. Building one takes a lot of “want to”.
 

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