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A must see for all Yuneec pilots New and old

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I've been on this forum for a while now and have noticed a lot of questions come up again and again. I feel if their was a main sticky to point new members here first it just might save them time money and aggravation. I found this very informative video section form Yuneec of the UK site. It covers most of the important pre flight check to ptopper takeoff and landings.
I hope this set of videos help the community.
Regards.
Mike.
Please find the link below.
PS. I taught that I would also include a short video I found regarding problems we can encounter while landing.
 
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Interesting video, lot's of drones on "Auto Land" will do some bouncing along, I think it's because of the high air pressure developed by the down thrust of prop wash and trapped between the drone & ground, creates kind of a bubble under the drone.
 

NorWiscPilot

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Actually, there is likely a much simpler answer to the bouncing upon landing. Rather, two conditions:

1) A bounce happens when descent speed is such that the aircraft has no choice but to bounce. The higher the speed, the more severe the bounce. Physics. Period.

2) A hop will occur when the flight controller does not bring the motors down to idle quick enough to prevent the aircraft from succumbing to the fact the props are still spinning, providing sufficient lift to counteract gravity. The aircraft may tilt to one side. The flight controller, or the pilot [unknowingly] applies yaw and/or pitch input, exacerbating the situation. Note: intentional throttle is most likely not an issue here, as having the throttle completely down is the method to bring the motors to idle upon landing. (Is there a left or right tilt of the throttle stick? Perhaps a contributing factor in “hopping” or tilting.)

The remedy once the hop starts, is to abort the landing by applying sufficient throttle to counteract/override any unintended inputs, and gain altitude quickly. A pilot must anticipate this condition on every landing so as to be ready to abort instantly. Wait too long and one is replacing props.

The solution to the bounce landing is practice, practice, practice. Be mindful that some forceful landings are necessary, if conditions warrant (I.e. very windy:gusty conditions, emergency, etc.)

The solution to preventing any hopping is to minimize the chance of bouncing, while at the same time ensure one is not inadvertently applying yaw or pitch input. Ever notice, while watching a commercial or video of someone playing a video game? The player leans one way or another, subconsciously trying to use body english to maneuver whatever they are trying to control.

The inexperienced pilot may be doing the same thing, leaning in, while putting even the slightest pressure on the sticks, keeping them from neutral and thus applying power when it should be going to idle.

In the video referenced, showing the H hopping across the dirt road... completely agree it was pilot incompetence. Not saying error. The pilot simply did not know the aircraft and thus did not possess the skills to recover and try again. Either incompetence, or intentional attempt to smear the reputation of the Typhoon H.

Respectfully,

Jeff

[Edit: I should have stated in my original post: even when prepared, practiced, competent, sometimes we just can’t save one of our aircraft if it is hellbent on misbehaving.

I had some interesting flights yesterday (05Apr20). Because the ice is no longer trustworthy, I had to fly from the driveway. Note I am in the woods. I have a couple elevator shafts to navigate to get above the trees; definitely not the 100 foot radius for clear GPS signal.

Flights, in order if memory correct:

1) first landing... motors didn’t idle and could hear some were revving. Full power saved it. That sucker was almost 90 degrees before it righted itself and became airborne.

2) right after takeoff had a GPS disabled warning. Still full control, just had to “fly the plane”. Since I had no room for error, meaning I could not take my eyes off it, ‘lest I fall victim to the tree magnets, I landing the H without incident. Motors idled and stopped just fine. Did not power down; just checked GPS setting. It was ON. Turned GPS off then back on and took flight. No issues.

3) good flight, no issues.

4) good flight until landing. Same issue as first flight; motors did not go to idle. Tried to get back in the air. All I managed to do was a more pronounced tip and flip. Since the ground is still mainly a soggy carpet instead of grass, no damage that I could see.

Bottom line: sometimes things misbehave no matter how prepared or experienced or may be.

One more tidbit: I had a suspect compass calibration a few days before. Suspect in that during one of the spins, I almost dropped the aircraft due to one of the motor arms collapsing (worn clip). I wanted to test to see if there was any adverse effect. Several extended flights under the trees were good. Even got a head start on the leaf blowing!

Since there could be a correlation, I will be performing another compass calibration, or more, until I get a good, did not fumble, attempt completed.
 
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I agree Jeff, I've also had my drones land on Auto only to have literally hoover at ground level, a split second delay before the onboard sensors agree that there isn't any more decent needed, and I've had my light weight drones hop around for a while at ground level moving from side to side riding on the high pressure bubble, I guess with the "H" with the props that high off the ground the high pressure bubble wouldn't be a factor,

Gotta cut power when your feet touch the ground,,,,,,,
 
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Interesting video, lot's of drones on "Auto Land" will do some bouncing along, I think it's because of the high air pressure developed by the down thrust of prop wash and trapped between the drone & ground, creates kind of a bubble under the drone.
Called vortex ring state. Keith C.Can also happen midair. I always fly down a little back and forth till I get close to the ground.Keith C.
 

Murray Martz

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I've been on this forum for a while now and have noticed a lot of questions come up again and again. I feel if their was a main sticky to point new members here first it just might save them time money and aggravation. I found this very informative video section form Yuneec of the UK site. It covers most of the important pre flight check to ptopper takeoff and landings.
I hope this set of videos help the community.
Regards.
Mike.
Please find the link below.
PS. I taught that I would also include a short video I found regarding problems we can encounter while landing.
The video makes a lot of sense.
 
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I like the video and it has some good info.
My TH would flip on landings at times and I could not figure it out. I tried calibrating everything except the ST16. Once I did a hidden menu calibration on my controller, my problems went away. Now I have VERY smooth landings without issue.
 

DoomMeister

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I like the video and it has some good info.
My TH would flip on landings at times and I could not figure it out. I tried calibrating everything except the ST16. Once I did a hidden menu calibration on my controller, my problems went away. Now I have VERY smooth landings without issue.
I would like to add that while the hidden menu ST-16 calibration can fix problems, it can produce or exacerbate problems also.

The potentiometers in the control gimbals are, putting it bluntly, cheap junk and are prone to oxidation in the device itself and the connectors that link it with the system. Ensuring they are clean and functioning properly is a must before doing the calibration. Doing so after the calibration will usually cause troubles in the direction opposite of the reason it was performed in the first place.
 

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