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Need clarification altimeter or barometer

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Im confused in what I'm reading online and what I thought I was pretty clear on already... In the wizard remote there is supposed to be the ability to tell elevation and from what I'm reading it's always mentioned as a barometer that is installed for this purpose? I was under the impression that a barometer is used to predict storms ect... and an altimeter is used to determine elevation above sea level? I'm probably just missing something here but,, any clarification would be awesome.

Thanks
 
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A barometer measures static air pressure. This measurement can in turn be used to predict weather, as a relatively lower air pressure indicates a cold front and visa versa.
So yes, instruments that indicate altitude (via air pressure) use a barometer.
 
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Im confused in what I'm reading online and what I thought I was pretty clear on already... In the wizard remote there is supposed to be the ability to tell elevation and from what I'm reading it's always mentioned as a barometer that is installed for this purpose? I was under the impression that a barometer is used to predict storms ect... and an altimeter is used to determine elevation above sea level? I'm probably just missing something here but,, any clarification would be awesome.

Thanks
the definition of altimeter
This should help. The barometer is in the altimeter.
 
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They are both the same thing. They both respond to changes in atmospheric pressure.
An BAROMETER has a face or scale to read out Barometric pressure.
An ALTIMETER has a face or scale to give a read out of height above sea level.
 
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Now,, gotta see if I can find out how to disable this thing as I have no use for it.
 
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Rayray

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Be nice, DC. This discussion as it pertains to drones is above my pay grade, and I don't know exactly how Yuneec decides how high the drone is. My understanding is that using GPS for height has too coarse a resolution. Down low of course, ultrasonic, radar, or infrared can be used. For instance, the H will not land if the legs are up.

Higher up, they probably use barometric pressure, and reset the measurement close to zero at the start of every flight.
This tech is evolving, and radar units are getting cheaper.

Sorry if I've messed this up.
 
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Be nice, DC. This discussion as it pertains to drones is above my pay grade, and I don't know exactly how Yuneec decides how high the drone is. My understanding is that using GPS for height has too coarse a resolution. Down low of course, ultrasonic, radar, or infrared can be used. For instance, the H will not land if the legs are up.

Higher up, they probably use barometric pressure, and reset the measurement close to zero at the start of every flight.
This tech is evolving, and radar units are getting cheaper.

Sorry if I've messed this up.
I was not ragging you ! I was seriously complementing you Ray, as I have no clue either my friendly friend !:)
 
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I was speaking to a Yuneec rep and he stated that the barometer is used for elevation and that the H knows the difference in elevation from the wizard to the H. The reason for asking this is because the component is always referred to as a barometer instead of altimeter. Either way I'm not sure that he was correct. I have another H on the way and I used the wizard many times prior to the crash that put my H on the bottom with Nemo... During all the flights I noticed that the H would make extreme upwards and downwards movements if I moved the wizard fast. As if it was using a G-sensor. The rep says that there is also a G-sensor in the wizard as well. I believe this to be the culprit of the crash... I'll be conducting test to see if there is any truth to it and posting here.. Also ,, Yuneec stated that they will probably be updating in the future the firmware so that the telemetry data is recorded even when using the wizard . I think that's good idea since there video on the front page shows someone using the wizard as standalone in a public area and the H starts at about 15' back and 10' up from the user. Thanks for your responses :)
 
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When using the Wizard you can switch dynamic altitude on or off. Switching it on uses barometer information from the Wizard to control the Z axis of the H. Switching it off uses the barometer in the H for Z axis control. Dynamic altitude is very useful in follow if you change elevation.

Yuneec warns to turn dynamic altitude off in many follow situations when using the Wizard. Maybe G forces of sudden altitude changes can cause issues.
 
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Rayray

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Oh my. I doubt there is more than a GPS module in the Wizard. I see warnings that say to beware of walking/running to higher altitudes than where you started.
 

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Just for giggles, our systems use a type of pressure sensor that is quite sensitive. Ground level is "zero altitude" in theory but often there's a few feet of differential showing in telemetry with the copter sitting at ground level. In effect the sensors measure the decrease in pressure as the copter climbs and the increase as it descends to compute the delta using what's called a lapse rate for ease of computation. Here's a nasty little secret about these pressure sensors. Often there's a small hole somewhere to provide free movement of air to the pressure sensor. Wildly swinging the Wizard around could put such a small hole in a position to be impacted by the moving air mass, causing positive or negative pressure. Should that happen there would be wild changes in pressure reporting and a corresponding change at a MR that was in flight. This exact thing happened with another FC some time back and they had to cover the opening with foam to minimize pressure differentials caused by a moving air mass. We really would like to measure air pressure when it is an undisturbed state, not accelerated. In a perfect world we would also factor temperature and humidity into the pressure data to obtain more altitude accuracy, but what we have works pretty well.
 
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