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H520 in Wind

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A Fantastic flyer! And DataPilot is superb. I think they need to improve the cameras and the firmware may need some tweeks, but what the next evolution of the hex will be, I can't imagine.:D
 
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PatR

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Just for discussion, our aircraft wind limitations are most always a lot higher than what a manufacturer prints in a system manual or user guide. They establish wind limitations based heavily on "newbie" flying ability and use a wind speed low enough to allow the aircraft to get back to the starting point in RTH modes. RTH is the slowest automated speed the aircraft flies because more system resources are being used. If normal RTH speed is 10mph the documentation may limit allowable wind speeds to 8mph. OTOH, if your aircraft can fly at 40mph in a manual mode the safe allowable wind speed will be that at which the aircraft can maintain an unassisted hover (without operator input) and penetrate into the wind for a return trip against the wind. It's not possible for a manufacturer to predict operator ability to establish a maximum allowable wind speed.

The operator's ability to manually control the aircraft is also a large part of the maximum wind speed. If an operator is "instinctive" with control functions and understands how to "lean" the aircraft into the wind for T/O and landing they will be capable of flying in higher winds speeds than an operator that has to put a lot of effort into "reacting" with the controls to what the aircraft is doing, and dependent on the aircraft to T/O and land itself. Bottom line is that as long as a flight controller retains the ability to keep the aircraft stabilized during higher wind speeds, and the system has the ability to make decent headway against the wind, the aircraft's wind limit will not be reached until the aircraft fails to meet either or both of those requirements. Everyone has to explore personal and system limitations to arrive at a maximum operational wind speed. For the H that speed is pretty high and the 520 is even higher if your flight skills are up to the conditions.

Don't be afraid to become a test pilot to establish your limitations. Explore the system limitations in progressive steps as your skill increases. You'll become a better operator in the process.
 
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Just for discussion, our aircraft wind limitations are most always a lot higher than what a manufacturer prints in a system manual or user guide. They establish wind limitations based heavily on "newbie" flying ability and use a wind speed low enough to allow the aircraft to get back to the starting point in RTH modes. RTH is the slowest automated speed the aircraft flies because more system resources are being used. If normal RTH speed is 10mph the documentation may limit allowable wind speeds to 8mph. OTOH, if your aircraft can fly at 40mph in a manual mode the safe allowable wind speed will be that at which the aircraft can maintain an unassisted hover (without operator input) and penetrate into the wind for a return trip against the wind. It's not possible for a manufacturer to predict operator ability to establish a maximum allowable wind speed.

The operator's ability to manually control the aircraft is also a large part of the maximum wind speed. If an operator is "instinctive" with control functions and understands how to "lean" the aircraft into the wind for T/O and landing they will be capable of flying in higher winds speeds than an operator that has to put a lot of effort into "reacting" with the controls to what the aircraft is doing, and dependent on the aircraft to T/O and land itself. Bottom line is that as long as a flight controller retains the ability to keep the aircraft stabilized during higher wind speeds, and the system has the ability to make decent headway against the wind, the aircraft's wind limit will not be reached until the aircraft fails to meet either or both of those requirements. Everyone has to explore personal and system limitations to arrive at a maximum operational wind speed. For the H that speed is pretty high and the 520 is even higher if your flight skills are up to the conditions.

Don't be afraid to become a test pilot to establish your limitations. Explore the system limitations in progressive steps as your skill increases. You'll become a better operator in the process.
Well said. But in regards to your first paragraph, remember that speed is based on GPS, which is speed over the ground. And so to the aircraft, there is no such thing as wind per se. It's doing what it needs to do follow a command based on ground speed. So if the wind is 20mph and it is doing an RTL in a head wind, it will still fly over the ground at 10mph (using your example) to home point but have an IAS of 30mph.
 

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