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Yuneec dropped the ball........

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Or the cost of shipping will override the repairs needed so much that it won't be worth it.
It's surprising what the guys churn up or here regarding spares with sources from dealers and eBay in US. If there was an item I needed then wherever in the world I would get it, if it meant I could fly again, I believe most who have flown the H for some time have read the stories on here and elsewhere about shortages and done what they could to stock up, there are plenty of pilots who have bought crashed ones for spares etc, obviously if your coming into the platform bed it's not the ideal time, especially being in US, but nothing gets made forever, it's getting harder to get essential parts.
 
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I have been watching videos from 3 years ago up until about 1 year ago. How can they let this happen. I know everything might or will become obsolete but after these videos which are mostly positive it's sickening. I flew the mini yesterday in forest park here in st.louis where parts of the park are open. The mini came as advertised but I like to be able to see the craft and that's another reason to keep the h alive. Just venting. I know this has already been said.
 
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That's the plan because this is the top of the apex for me. All three are ready complete with clips, set screws and all. I will keep flying as long as the brain holds up(). If they all become inoperable then those parts are for those whoever are around or alive.
 
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It’s all water under the bridge now. Use them until you no longer can and move to something else.
Problem is it's a good platform so deserves a little effort to keep it going, which some are doing, at least it doesn't snoop on it's user, it's a toy yes but a good toy.
 
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Phaedrus

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I buy lots of RC stuff from the EU. I'll have no issues doing that if that what it takes to avoid DJI. I refuse to use a platform that makes me request their permission to operate it.
 

PatR

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A much too accurate analogy. You didn’t mention the part where after a certain period of time you start wondering why they are still present
 
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more than 900,000 customers who loved what I did for them. I had a 4-star rating with the BBB...

...I really feel Yuneec dropped the ball when it comes to their drones.

I was fortunate to have read the forum and with 2020 hindsight of the pilots here and across many sources, bought the bird , for that reason in front of mind..with the bench and seat of the pants going forward past warranties and little blow back for doing so, and being purely a pass time for me now, i can afford the down time easier and the time sink is mostly fun.
 

PatR

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Those paying attention to the various sate of Yuneec affairs over the last couple years could easily read the writing on the wall and prepare for what has come to pass today. Advance spare parts buying for any drone model is always a good idea if you plan on keeping one as they all get phased out. When the company is failing we want to be ahead of the failure and have some parts on hand when they close their doors.

Such was the case when I bought a 920. It was already discontinued in all but formal announcement so a spares kit was in order. Landing gear, motors, motor mounts, booms, props, and dampers were obtained to assure the unit would remain functional for a long time.

For current H owners that were unprepared, there’s not much that can now be done unless Yuneec decides to start making stuff again. But it’s something to remember the next time you buy a drone. If you like it and prefer to keep using it instead of constantly buying the next “latest, greatest”, buy spares in advance.
 
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Dnes ráno jsem viděl další příspěvek, že Yuneec ukončil svou podporu USA. Mám podezření, že je to pravda, protože již nemůžete naplánovat ani telefonát podpory.

I saw another post this morning that Yuneec has closed its US support. I suspect that is true as you can no longer schedule a support phone call either.
Doom,

Prices are in large a part of supply and demand. Original list prices hit the circular file as soon as the parent product ceases production or the parent company goes out of business. Both of those conditions are, I believe, applicable with the H and Yuneec. As the H continues to be flown many will break things and need parts and as the parts supply decreases the prices will increase.

Some have either failed or refused to recognize some important points. All consumer drone models are designed and marketed with planned obsolescence. No manufacturer intends for them to be used forever. Once the peak sales period has passed a point comes where the makers decide to cease production of parts and batteries in order to focus on new model sales, which for them generates much higher profits than parts sales. DJI is the demonstrative example of that practice, and the cause of Yuneec later following suit.

The H-480 has, in effect, been out of production for at least as long as new batteries became unavailable. Call that two years, perhaps a little longer. Focus on the H-480 ended before the release of the H Plus, and most likely occurred during the final stages of H-520 development. When the 520 was announced those more astute should have recognized the H-480 was no longer Yuneec’s flagship platform. Those owning H-480’s intending to fly them forever should have been planning ahead and started buying the most commonly needed spare parts at that time, knowing they would be hard to find and more expensive later. Another option is to buy up crashed aircraft for their spare parts. Some did one or both of those for the 920, with no regrets.

There were some either incorrect or exaggerated statements in the OP’s post. The H-480 in all forms never cost “almost $2,000.00” unless it came with the thermal camera. Around $1,200.00 for a full kit was the common selling price.

No consumer drone is built with user serviceable main boards. Component integration makes that nearly impossible. Yuneec provided an advantage of being built with modular components, allowing for easy replacement using the R&R method to replace bad with good. DJI systems are much more difficult to work with, and often impossible to repair without being sent to a repair facility.

There has also been mention of failure to provide for payload versatility. If the OP had much of a history with multirotors he might have mentioned that virtually no consumer drone maker offered this feature until the Inspire 1 was released. The Phantom series did not have that capability until after the P-3, with models that had such capability being quite expensive.

The complaint of used CGO-3+ cameras being expensive at $200.00-$300.00 is, IMHO, laughable. Buy a new one if you can find it. It will cost more. People crash their equipment and most always kill the camera in the process, which makes cameras a high demand component. Anyone that has a fully functional spare knows it’s value and is unlikely to part with one cheaply unless they no longer have any possible future use of it. Those that need cameras have the choice of paying the market price or buying another drone for considerably more money. Speaking of money, those buying DJI cameras pay a much steeper price.

It’s unfortunate, but from my perspective Yuneec is pretty much done as s company. All the indicators have been steadily accumulating since Yuneec’s first reorganization several years ago. That was followed by the bankruptcy of a wholesale distributor, splitting up the California office’s sales, customer service, repairs, and warehousing, failure to launch to two announced products at the 2018 CES, failure to follow up with payload diversification, to be followed by outsourcing repairs, to be again followed by the bankruptcy of the outsourced repair facilities. That stuff happens when companies no longer have the money to continue operations. In the U.S. companies try to hang in there as long as they can but eventually recognize it costs more to stay open than to close. I suspect in China they keep the name alive as long as they can to sell off whatever unsold inventory is left on the shelves, using the absolute minimum staffing to get it done. It’s entirely possible that in the near future any filled orders will be handled by some person working with a few parts in their home garage after actively scouring the web looking for orders for the few parts they have left.

The H-480 is long past done. It’s obsolete in many ways. It’s still quite useful but people need to understand that if they break them or want more out of them it may be time to move on.
Anyone who has done anything knows that cabinfourus is right. Repairs difficult to access, not interested. Mainly buy and leave. Buy a new one. I don't like the prices. Take a look at the little one: 4 screws for $ 8? Is this a really complicated device? I have experience as cabfourus 7.4.2020.
 
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DoomMeister

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@RudaR

When Yuneec closed shop in the US at the end of last year there were no options to for customers in the US to get parts at all. Many parted out aircraft were put up on eBay at prices 10 to 15 times the price they were beforehand. When the company that was doing warranty repair for Yuneec US had to declare bankruptcy all of the stock went up for auction. It was our good fortune that @Yuneec Skins was able to win many of the auctions of that equipment. He sells parts at prices that are below the prices that were found on eBay by unscrupulous sellers. There are costs associated with warehousing the stock, running inventory, website hosting, being an Approved Vendor, etc. (aka overhead).

I would suggest you find vendors in Europe that can accommodate you at better pricing. There is Yuneec EU, copters.eu, and eBay (in EU). I am sure you could source those screws locally for a lot less. A search on the forum will reveal the size of those screws.

Please refrain from trashing our Approved Vendors. You are welcome to shop elsewhere.
 
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I understand you. But I also advised. I said screws and it was a comparison when they told me and wrote that everything is good and therefore must be expensive. That's why I used the word - ordinary screws, which are free everywhere. I have a lot of screws, but Yuneec made them so that the ordinary could not be used intentionally. I know a lot about the store. I also read the regrets of others over drone accidents and cannot be repaired. I'm fine.
 

DoomMeister

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The company of Yuneec sourced screws like any other business. The screws in question are a higher quality machine screw that will resist corroding. Admittedly if you shop locally for them they will be less expensive. A lot of the stock that @Yuneec Skins acquired had to be sorted and classified as to what it was used for. Instead of just throwing mixed inventory into the trash it was salvaged for use. In the terms of DIY it is called sweat equity, but when you resell you take into account your time and effort.

Just to make things clear for you all of our members are owners just like yourself. This forum is not affiliated with the company of Yuneec. @Yuneec Skins is not part of Yuneec the company, he is a Yuneec customer just like the rest of us. He does run a business that caters to Yuneec owners and that business expanded early in 2020.

I believe you have made your point about expenses of owning and operating a drone. There are less expensive ways of enjoying the hobby, but it requires a lot of digging around on the internet and a willingness to build your own aircraft.
 

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