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GPS Question

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Please tell me.
A simple Yes or No
Will do. Or more if you
Like.
Do Clouds affect your
GPS signal.
Thanks Keith Kuhn
 

Mrgs1

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According to what you sent the answer is NO

But when you read
on, it says not much.

So I will accept very slight
as far as clouds are
Concerned.
Thanks
Keith Kuhn
In 99% of situations no, probably best not to worry too much, probably the only way is to measure with the appropriate equipment, which your copter wouldn't detect, your talking about small changes, your H is not that critical, it's not that a precision of a machine.
 
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In 99% of situations no, probably best not to worry too much, probably the only way is to measure with the appropriate equipment, which your copter wouldn't detect, your talking about small changes, your H is not that critical, it's not that a precision of a machine.

You are rite about it not being that precision of a machine.
I am not even sure how far I should trust my altimiter.
I fly 20 feet higher,just in
Case.
Winter is here not flying
that much anyway.
I always think about the
next malfunction, I am sure there will be one.
I know this through experience.
Keith
 
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Keith if we start worrying about clouds we would not get out to fly lol but as long as it's not grey clouds you are fine
 
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PatR

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I can understand where Keith is coming from as a dense column of water will block most radio signals Unless you have some level of understanding with RF propagation and the manner GPS signals originate you might not recognize the answer can’t be a simple yes no.

The best way to answer him would require drawing some pictures showing how GPS originates and is broadcast with a constellation of satellites along with a representation of an aircraft in positions relative to dense columns of water. Being “doped up” after having a knee replaced last week I can’t trust myself to produce more than an incoherent scribble.

A short description would say that a cloud body such as a thunderstorm can block GPS signals from passing through but the aircraft would have to be inside the T-storm or very close to the bottom of it.

OTOH, if the aircraft has any decent separation form a high water density cloud formation the satellites broadcasting from locations not directly over the cloud body would compensate for the loss of overhead signals.
 
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Mrgs1

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I think there's too many scenarios or variables to be able to give a definitive answer, every cloud, rain, or weather phenomenon would be different over the world, where the pilot is positioned in respect of the clouds or storms, I think people can only give a general answer, I'm sure people have had different experiences around the world, what may affect one may not another, I think most are able to judge if rain or any major weather event is imminent, and take appropriate steps.
 

PatR

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I think most are able to judge if rain or any major weather event is imminent, and take appropriate steps.
There’s much to be said in favor of that. Hopefully people are at least as smart as the average turkey, who will look to get out of the rain and hunker down until it’s over.
 

Mrgs1

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There’s much to be said in favor of that. Hopefully people are at least as smart as the average turkey, who will look to get out of the rain and hunker down until it’s over.
Probably more important at Christmas, a low profile is definitely needed then.But let's face it, there's a lot of information one can check, to make an informed decision, if it's safe to fly,. Obviously if your not a hobbyist, then you possibly have to be a little more daring.
 
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Rain by itself is not a big factor.
Wet tree leaves, especially pine needles, attenuate the 5.8Ghz video signal noticeably.
 
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I have experienced GPS signal problems when flying on days with lots of convective activity and very tall CuNim (30 - 40,000 feet) surrounding the area. With these clouds containing intense amounts of rain and hail, they DO block signals from satellites that are lower in the sky. Getting a good enough set of GPS satellites to start the motors is troublesome. In order to get photos of these beautiful, huge white CuNims I ended up disabling the GPS and flying the H480 manually. The wind was light so this didn't cause a big pilot workload.
 
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I can understand where Keith is coming from as a dense column of water will block most radio signals Unless you have some level of understanding with RF propagation and the manner GPS signals originate you might not recognize the answer can’t be a simple yes no.

The best way to answer him would require drawing some pictures showing how GPS originates and is broadcast with a constellation of satellites along with a representation of an aircraft in positions relative to dense columns of water. Being “doped up” after having a knee replaced last week I can’t trust myself to produce more than an incoherent scribble.

A short description would say that a cloud body such as a thunderstorm can block GPS signals from passing through but the aircraft would have to be inside the T-storm or very close to the bottom of it.

OTOH, if the aircraft has any decent separation form a high water density cloud formation the satellites broadcasting from locations not directly over the cloud body would compensate for the loss of overhead signals.

I love this reply this is the detailed information I am looking for.
Rock on my friend you know your stuff.
I mean you have the right stuff.
Keith
I have experienced GPS signal problems when flying on days with lots of convective activity and very tall CuNim (30 - 40,000 feet) surrounding the area. With these clouds containing intense amounts of rain and hail, they DO block signals from satellites that are lower in the sky. Getting a good enough set of GPS satellites to start the motors is troublesome. In order to get photos of these beautiful, huge white CuNims I ended up disabling the GPS and flying the H480 manually. The wind was light so this didn't cause a big pilot workload.
Wow
Flying without GPS scares
Me. Even if it is little or no wind.
Keith
 

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