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I knew this was going to happen

DoomMeister

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Drones used as counter surveillance against Law Enforcement.
Drone swarm criminals - Bing
Nothing a shotgun couldn’t have alleviated. Their position was already compromised, can’t believe they didn’t take them down. Of course something that would produce a focused EMP would do a better job at downing most multirotor craft.
 
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Steve Carr

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Nothing a shotgun couldn’t have alleviated. Their position was already compromised, can’t believe they didn’t take them down. Of course something that would produce a focused EMP would do a better job at downing most multirotor craft.
Exactly, a few blasts and the "swarm" is gone. Even though this story is being widely publicized, there is something seriously wrong with the whole of it. Also curious about the motivation behind the release by the FBI. Are they saying they can't deal with a few drones in the air? BTW, what constitutes a "Swarm"?
 
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DoomMeister

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The whole thing seems a little fishy to me also. Hard to believe the FBI would be stymied by a few quads. Heck, most farmers know how to deal with pesky birds. I’m sure the FBI could easily dispatch a few “drones”.
 
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I did some research on the topic and found that it was run in a number of media outlets, including The Washington Times, and Newsweek. The link to the Times’ article is below.

While the reaction of the extraction team is alarming, it is not surprising to me. Being in Public Safety for over thirty years (LE and Emergency Mgt), I can tell you that most ops are planned identifying things like the breech-point and Rules of Engagement (ROE). Plans even include contingencies for unknown elements such as an all out assault by the criminal element, IEDs, and unexpected visitors.

Whether it was a swarm, or even 1 drone, if I were on that extraction team the following would immediately go through my mind:

1. My position, and the element of surprise has been comprised; what are my ROEs.

2. I need to prepare for an assault and harden my position.

3. Do we breech or hold positions, knowing that the criminal element is now preparing for a breech and the safety of the hostage(s) is at risk.

I’m not saying this was the scenario; I’m just giving a possible explanation for the loss of situational awareness. One thing I can say with complete confidence is that drones will definitely be included in contingency plans going into the future.

Gang used swarming drones to attack FBI; ‘high-speed’ passes targeted hostage rescue team
 

DoomMeister

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I did some research on the topic and found that it was run in a number of media outlets, including The Washington Times, and Newsweek. The link to the Times’ article is below.

While the reaction of the extraction team is alarming, it is not surprising to me. Being in Public Safety for over thirty years (LE and Emergency Mgt), I can tell you that most ops are planned identifying things like the breech-point and Rules of Engagement (ROE). Plans even include contingencies for unknown elements such as an all out assault by the criminal element, IEDs, and unexpected visitors.

Whether it was a swarm, or even 1 drone, if I were on that extraction team the following would immediately go through my mind:

1. My position, and the element of surprise has been comprised; what are my ROEs.

2. I need to prepare for an assault and harden my position.

3. Do we breech or hold positions, knowing that the criminal element is now preparing for a breech and the safety of the hostage(s) is at risk.

I’m not saying this was the scenario; I’m just giving a possible explanation for the loss of situational awareness. One thing I can say with complete confidence is that drones will definitely be included in contingency plans going into the future.

Gang used swarming drones to attack FBI; ‘high-speed’ passes targeted hostage rescue team
The illegal use of sUAS craft in this scenario is what ends up driving all types of legislation that ends up limiting the rights and freedoms of the law abiding citizen.

I know sUAS craft were used in the confrontations in the Dakotas over the pipeline and several were arrested for violating the TFR that the government had placed over that area. They didn’t want social media access to the stuff going on there.

This quote from the Washington Times article is what this whole thing boils down to:

“Remote identification is a huge piece [of cutting down on drone crime],” Angela Stubblefield, the FAA’s deputy associate administrator in the office of security and hazardous materials safety, told the website. “[It enables] both air traffic control and other UAS [unmanned areal systems] to know where another is and enabling beyond line-of-sight operations. It also has an extensive security benefit to it, which is to enable threat discrimination. Remote ID connected to registration would allow you to have information about each UAS, who owns it, operates it, and thus have some idea what its intent is.”

I am not 107 certified at the present time and realize that hobbyist (336) pilots have some looser restrictions placed on them, but I always fly as if I were part 107 certified. The biggest part of all this is the government and big business like DJI, AirMap, Amazon and others forcing a system on us that they will make billions of dollars on. It will end up being a pay to fly system.

Criminals use any technology to accomplish their destructive force on society, what needs to happen in cases like this is just like using guns or internet to commit a felony. Add a stiffer sentence to the felon when they are tried and convicted.
 
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The illegal use of sUAS craft in this scenario is what ends up driving all types of legislation that ends up limiting the rights and freedoms of the law abiding citizen.

I know sUAS craft were used in the confrontations in the Dakotas over the pipeline and several were arrested for violating the TFR that the government had placed over that area. They didn’t want social media access to the stuff going on there.

This quote from the Washington Times article is what this whole thing boils down to:

“Remote identification is a huge piece [of cutting down on drone crime],” Angela Stubblefield, the FAA’s deputy associate administrator in the office of security and hazardous materials safety, told the website. “[It enables] both air traffic control and other UAS [unmanned areal systems] to know where another is and enabling beyond line-of-sight operations. It also has an extensive security benefit to it, which is to enable threat discrimination. Remote ID connected to registration would allow you to have information about each UAS, who owns it, operates it, and thus have some idea what its intent is.”

I am not 107 certified at the present time and realize that hobbyist (336) pilots have some looser restrictions placed on them, but I always fly as if I were part 107 certified. The biggest part of all this is the government and big business like DJI, AirMap, Amazon and others forcing a system on us that they will make billions of dollars on. It will end up being a pay to fly system.

Criminals use any technology to accomplish their destructive force on society, what needs to happen in cases like this is just like using guns or internet to commit a felony. Add a stiffer sentence to the felon when they are tried and convicted.
Completely agree with you. All too often law abiding hobbyists, gun owners, internet users, etc are the only ones to be penalized for the activities of the criminal element. I’ve said it often, laws keep honest people honest; to attempt to enact laws to make criminals honest or institute stiffer penalties is like pissing in the wind.
 
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DoomMeister

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I wholeheartedly agree!!!
 
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Soon all flights of UAV's are going to be tracked, that is if they aren't already. You might just get a summons to appear in court to defend yourself. Most GPS units have I.D. numbers that can be tracked.
There was one situation I heard about in which a motorcyclist lost his license because his GPS snitched on his excessive speed. The idiot had gone over 200 mph in a 55 mph zone. When he down loaded the map updates the data up loaded to prove when and where he did this moronic stunt. When you update maps there is data uploaded from your GPS to add to the corrections and expand the map database.
 
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PatR

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Some have yet to realize the most criminal activities being conducted are those being administered by government agencies. They never want their activities overseen by civilians. It forces them to act Constitutionally, while placing visibility on individuals and agencies that could be held responsible.
 
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My favorite one I have heard on the news here in Louisville, KY is Secret Search Warrants.
When I heard about those I started making my house very difficult to come into. All windows are locked down, all doors have security chain on every external door. The main door we use for entering and exiting has one link cut out close to the door jamb and a pad lock replaces the cut link. Then a cable tie that has special markings on it ties the same link the padlock is on. People may still get in, But I will know it and security footage will record it.
I believe that the secret search warrants are more about planting evidence than having a justifiable cause to search a house.
 
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I find the statement that anyone can easily fly a drone very untrue. To dive bomb an FBI swat team in the city would take some experience. There are trees, power lines, power poles, vehicles etc. There is also quite a bit of interference. in order for a pilot to dive bomb a swat team, they would have to have good visual and pretty easy to spot themselves.
 
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I find the statement that anyone can easily fly a drone very untrue. To dive bomb an FBI swat team in the city would take some experience. There are trees, power lines, power poles, vehicles etc. There is also quite a bit of interference. in order for a pilot to dive bomb a swat team, they would have to have good visual and pretty easy to spot themselves.
I think the pilot who was dive bombing the agents had to have experience like FPV drone racing. Not a casual flyer like myself or others here.
 
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