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After all the research and testings, I now believe that the reason my q500 cgo3 doesn't have tilt/pan is a broken mainboard... Am I in the right track guys? And where can i get a cheap board? Thank you very much
 

WTFDproject

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Can't get a link to work. Bought two from these folks. Pleased with price and shipping.

eBay search "Q500 (main, control, flight) board"

Look way down list for $69.95. MidCityHobby is a legitimate seller.
 
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Eagle's Eye Video

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@WTFDproject (and any others interested) The most effective way to post eBay links on this board, is to use the "Code Insert" option on the posting navigation panel, that appears above the text box, when you are posting.

Click on the 3 dots in between the smilie icon and the camera (Gallery Embed) icon. →
Select "Insert Code" → Select "HTML" from the drop-down menu that is above the text box, in the pop-up window that appears → Paste the eBay URL in that text box and it will show up as below:

HTML:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Yuneec-USA-Q500-Main-Control-Unit-Flight-Control-Board-YUNQ500109/272370540929?epid=2256010949
 

WTFDproject

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a broken mainboard
The common main board failure that results in loss of usable PWM signal is the little "gizmo" in the picture below. I have replaced the "bad" one with the "good" one a couple of times, but it has been a real bear both times. The solder seems to have a higher melting temperature than most of the other board components, and can't be removed with a hot air station without damaging the board. Has to be removed with a tip load of hot solder on the end of your iron. Resoldering is also tricky, it is very difficult to get the new solder to bind. I have no idea why. It "looks" like anything else on the board, but I've had the same issues each time I tried. However, it did fix the issue both times.

You can't just relocate the white wire. The other PWM pin gets a different PWM code from the CPU.

By the way, these "gizmos" invert the PWM signal from the main CPU. If you look at the input and output of a normal "gizmo" on an oscilloscope, the on/off cycle for about 80% of the signal is exactly the same pattern, except on/off is reversed. On a failed gizmo, the input and output are identical (or there is no output at all).

You may have noticed by now I am not much of an electronics guy. I am more of "a mechanic with a soldering iron". I know just enough to compare a working thing with a non-working thing, and figure out which part needs to be replaced. I would LOVE for someone to step in and properly identify what a "gizmo" really is.

Any way, here is a picture of what to swap if you decide to try:
PWM switches.jpg
 
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The common main board failure that results in loss of usable PWM signal is the little "gizmo" in the picture below. I have replaced the "bad" one with the "good" one a couple of times, but it has been a real bear both times. The solder seems to have a higher melting temperature than most of the other board components, and can't be removed with a hot air station without damaging the board. Has to be removed with a tip load of hot solder on the end of your iron. Resoldering is also tricky, it is very difficult to get the new solder to bind. I have no idea why. It "looks" like anything else on the board, but I've had the same issues each time I tried. However, it did fix the issue both times.

You can't just relocate the white wire. The other PWM pin gets a different PWM code from the CPU.

By the way, these "gizmos" invert the PWM signal from the main CPU. If you look at the input and output of a normal "gizmo" on an oscilloscope, the on/off cycle for about 80% of the signal is exactly the same pattern, except on/off is reversed. On a failed gizmo, the input and output are identical (or there is no output at all).

You may have noticed by now I am not much of an electronics guy. I am more of "a mechanic with a soldering iron". I know just enough to compare a working thing with a non-working thing, and figure out which part needs to be replaced. I would LOVE for someone to step in and properly identify what a "gizmo" really is.

Any way, here is a picture of what to swap if you decide to try:
View attachment 13262
I tried the gizmo method and its working now... thank you very much.. WTFDproject
 

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