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Repair manuals ?

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I know these must exist somewhere ? How would one aquire these, or is there a training course/school ? The reason I ask is where do the techs learn before they are hired ? Alot of questions, because I believe they aren't trained in thier basement alone ?
 
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I'm sure you've heard of "on the job training", right? A few years ago, I was on the verge of being hired by Drones Plus. I have a (self-taught) tech background, as I've been custom-building computers for 25+ years.

Anyways, that's how my training would have been...except that I decided to go in a different direction, and became a professional chauffeur. I'm VERY happy I went the direction I did, as Drones Plus closed all their satellite locations a year later.
 
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I'm sure you've heard of "on the job training", right? A few years ago, I was on the verge of being hired by Drones Plus. I have a (self-taught) tech background, as I've been custom-building computers for 25+ years.

Anyways, that's how my training would have been...except that I decided to go in a different direction, and became a professional chauffeur. I'm VERY happy I went the direction I did, as Drones Plus closed all their satellite locations a year later.
Was just wondering how things worked I mean how would one apply, or be consitered a repair tech without formal training ? How does one achieve that status, or prove themselves ? They way things change there has to be a connect/ documentation, but how ?
 
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Thanx steve, but how does it relate to a particular product ? I know hands on is the best (how did you learn) I guess what I'm getting at is like the automotive market has done with cylmer repair manuals ? I hate to be pia, but I like to over whelm myself with knowledge, before I get my toes wet.
 

Steve Carr

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I had an electronics background (1966-1970) but moved on to different careers. Learning drone repair has been baby steps over the past few years. It's as much mechanical as electronics. I suspect than many of the techs hired into tech support operations have little or no training. I found this to be the case even when I worked on Compaq servers. The actual repair techs do need training and that is likely in-house. I suspect some of them pick up some tips from places like this.
 
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Like Mechanics have become only fitters now. Just fit a new part and on your way!
 
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The only way you're going to learn, is to get your "hands greasy"! OtJST (On the Job Self Training).
 
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PatR

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If someone acquires the basic knowledge and skills associated with electronic assemblies and do the work themselves they essentially become a “tech”. If they attended a trade school for electrical theory and hand’s on training so much the better. The moment they lay their hands on a drone to do any work they become a “drone tech”, whether they know what to do with one or not. Those that have successfully built and programmed a few drones using parts from various sources are generally more knowledgeable but with enough exposure most any intelligent person can become effective.

Reality is those associated with aerospace drone R&D programs typically have a much greater understanding of drone technology but few of those depart aerospace for the hobby sector as the earning potential between aerospace and the hobby sector is vastly different. You can starve to death in the hobby sector while your contemporary in the aerospace sector is eating steak, taking long vacations, and building a comfortable retirement portfolio.

Short version is many “drone techs” in the hobby/consumer drone sector knew almost nothing about the job when they were hired. Those that became good at it did so through the “immersion” method because they wanted to be good. Sink or swim, what happened depended on how hard they worked at it.
 
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If someone acquires the basic knowledge and skills associated with electronic assemblies and do the work themselves they essentially become a “tech”. If they attended a trade school for electrical theory and hand’s on training so much the better. The moment they lay their hands on a drone to do any work they become a “drone tech”, whether they know what to do with one or not. Those that have successfully built and programmed a few drones using parts from various sources are generally more knowledgeable but with enough exposure most any intelligent person can become effective.

Reality is those associated with aerospace drone R&D programs typically have a much greater understanding of drone technology but few of those depart aerospace for the hobby sector as the earning potential between aerospace and the hobby sector is vastly different. You can starve to death in the hobby sector while your contemporary in the aerospace sector is eating steak, taking ling vacations, and building a comfortable retirement portfolio.

Short version is many “drone techs” in the hobby/consumer drone sector knew almost nothing about the job when they were hired. Those that became good at it did so through the “immersion” method because they wanted to be good. Sink or swim, what happened depended on how hard they worked at it.
Thanx pat for the insight, just tryin to get a feel for this with limited pain, and dollars but I'll get there in time ?
 

PatR

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Just dive in. Read everything you can. Experiment anywhere possible that you can afford to lose, and don’t be afraid to lose.

Once you learn how ESC’s, batteries, motors, video transmitters, GPS, basic RC functionality, auto pilot theory, and some programming works you’ll be well on your way.

Multirotors are nothing more than a collection of independent components that will function independently but linked together to make an aircraft system. We cannot understand the whole until we understand the individual parts. It takes legwork and time but visiting various high end manufacturers provides a lot of info. I’ll suggest some major RC manufacturers like Castle Creations, Futaba, and KDE Direct be added to the mix.

Also, Eagle Tree night be helpful as their Vector FC has a very easy to understand manual with a lot of performance info.

GetFPV contains a tremendous amount of info relative to video systems and antennas. You’ll have to pick through it but eventually you’ll come to understand how they work and antenna performance.

Round it all out with a few visits to T-Motor as kind of a cross reference with KDE.

Gimbals and their set up is Voodoo. They are all different and only a few work well. Foxtech has a lot of different products with associated system info.

When all is said and done you might conclude it’s a lot of work to make a good camera rig. If you do you’ll be right. You’ll also find it costs a lot more to make a good camera rig than to buy a consumer drone, which combined with the work aspect, explains why only a few people make their own.
 
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Just dive in. Read everything you can. Experiment anywhere possible that you can afford to lose, and don’t be afraid to lose.

Once you learn how ESC’s, batteries, motors, video transmitters, GPS, basic RC functionality, auto pilot theory, and some programming works you’ll be well on your way.

Multirotors are nothing more than a collection of independent components that will function independently that are linked together to make an aircraft. We cannot understand the whole until we understand the individual parts. It takes legwork and time but visiting various high end manufacturers provides a lot of info. I’ll suggest some major RC manufacturers like Castle, Futaba, and KDE be added to the mix.
Thanx again, I was looking for an easy way out in the learning process, which really isnt possible theres always a curve ? But I really think this forum narrows the curve, thanx again this isnt the last of me.
 
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Fyi found this via google..
 

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