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Typhoon went for a swim. Advice Please

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My Typhoon H decided to bounce up with a mind of it's own after landing; flip; and walk it's way into a fresh water lake. I pulled it from the water fully submerged in less than 3 seconds; electrons are faster than 3 seconds; I know... Smoke was coming from the battery compartment; most likely some of ESCs on the mother broad. I have contacted Vertigo (they have been AWESOME every time I have gone to them) they suggested replacing the motherboard. They mentioned that they flight controller broad might be bad too; but is not something available on the market.

So here is the dilemma; questions; debate...

I cannot confirm if the camera is OK or any other electric parts of the drone. Now that it is completely dry can I try to power it up and see what works and what doesn't without fear of frying more components?

If anything other than the mother board needs to be replaced; i.e. the camera; flight controller; the cost of the repair starts to out be more than a new base unit.

Thoughts? Ideas? Suggestions?
 

PatR

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Under such circumstances my suggestion would be to send the entire aircraft, with camera, to Vertigo for assessment. What they find and the costs associated with an actual repair would determine the course to follow. If the cost of repair was prohibitive there’s a few of us out there with older used aircraft and cameras in great condition that could be had quite reasonably.
 
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I'm not familiar with the innards but am concerned when you say "completely dry". Most PCBs of recent manufacture, that I'm familiar with, are pretty much impervious to water but controls, motors, and the like are a different story. If, after ensuring that things really were dry, and I could identify what was smoking and make an educated guess as to why and correct it I'd try to power it up. But that's just me and not a recommendation.
It sounds like it made a real effort to commit suicide. Have you been treating it nice?
 
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Drying it out is a good start, but I would rinse with distilled water. Lake water can leave all sorts of things that can conduct. After rinsing, leave it to dry at least 24 hours. Even better, leave this to the pro's. They will undoubtedly have experience with swimming birds.
 

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It's interesting to me that the magic smoke came out. We used to regularly dunk our electric racing boats. 10S2P (20 cells) 42-volt packs, 330-amp ESCs, receivers, radios and motors the size of a Foster's Lager can.

Rarely ever fried anything. Blow off the water, spray Corrosion X into the parts and go racing again.
 

Steve Carr

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The damage may be confined to the battery. Once it gets water inside the housing the circuit board may not dry completely.
If you have a spare battery, insert it and connect the H to your computer. Install the GUI and turn on the H and look at the diagnostics. If everything has a green check mark, then test the motors one at a time.
 
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Is it possible for you to do some disassembly and closely inspect it? You may see visible damage or burn marks ie: battery connections etc. This might help you access the damage internally.
Hope you get in the air soon!
 
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If you're under warranty do not take it apart!
Unless you are very confident and know how to dissemble and repair, let the experts fix this. Even if it will cost you extra $$$$s.
 
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If it's going to cost a lot to repair, then you could use it for spares, shell, arms, landing gear, gimbal etc maybe some other bits too when it's dried out.
 
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Strip it down wash every thing, dry every thing, then wash electronics in IsoPropylalcohol, dry then think about testing. I did that to an electronic unit years ago that had been in a basement flooded by the Thames. worked perfect.
 
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So here's an update on my water log drone. I took it apart I cleaned everything I powered it up and hooked up the GUI. I have three ESCs that are burned up. Resulting in the replacement of a motherboard. The Drone is in good shape and working again. I do not believe I would have got off as easy if it would have been saltwater.
 
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DCH

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I do not believe I would have got off as easy if it would have been saltwater.
Yep saltwater and it would have been a total goner.

Any dunk in any water is a bad thing, however salt isn't necessarily the deal device breaker, the water is the primary concern, the salt is just another complication. The best chance of recovery after a saltwater swim (of any electronic device) is to remove the battery and submerge the unit in freshwater as soon as possible, and leave it there until you can take it apart to thoroughly clean and dry it. This will not induce any more damage or shorting than the original dunk did, and will immediately dilute the saline and prevent salt residue from drying and creating corrosion on components.

This is not a guarantee that the device can be saved, it will only increase the chances of survival by mitigating any further salt damage.
 
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PatR

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Although inappropriate to all electric multirotors I can say wirh a high level of certainty that any two stroke combustion engine running on diesel or heavy fuel requires a total tear engine down and replacement of many carb components after a salt water (ocean) dunking. There’s something about the fuel and saltwater combination that creates a jelly that fouls every moving part of the engine and totally clogs fuel passages. Fresh water is not nearly as much of a problem.
 

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I raced fast electric RC boats (42V-10S2P 360 amp ESCs) and gasoline powered (Zenoah 260 turning around 18K RPM).

Saltwater is a killer, especially for batteries. It is nearly impossible to get all the water, with its corrosive salt content, out of the cell connection, especially on sealed packs. Internal electronics also are more adversely affected, and much faster, when exposed to saltwater.

When we dunked either type of boat into freshwater normally all that was needed was to use canned air to blow things as dry as possible, then a quick spray of CorrosionX and back in business in a matter of an hour or less.

Saltwater generally packs were junked. Corrosion set in very quickly and in sealed packs it is very difficult to get the water out.

The IC engines in freshwater just needed to be cleared of water, sprayed out with CorrosionX and started up. Saltwater required a fast teardown and careful drying and lubricating, even then rust often showed up a bit later.

Here's a good video on the gasoline boat racing, lots of dunking. Boats capable of speeds up to 80 mph on the course depending on class. All running Zenoah 260 engines.

 
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I raced fast electric RC boats (42V-10S2P 360 amp ESCs) and gasoline powered (Zenoah 260 turning around 18K RPM).

Saltwater is a killer, especially for batteries. It is nearly impossible to get all the water, with its corrosive salt content, out of the cell connection, especially on sealed packs. Internal electronics also are more adversely affected, and much faster, when exposed to saltwater.

When we dunked either type of boat into freshwater normally all that was needed was to use canned air to blow things as dry as possible, then a quick spray of CorrosionX and back in business in a matter of an hour or less.

Saltwater generally packs were junked. Corrosion set in very quickly and in sealed packs it is very difficult to get the water out.

The IC engines in freshwater just needed to be cleared of water, sprayed out with CorrosionX and started up. Saltwater required a fast teardown and careful drying and lubricating, even then rust often showed up a bit later.

Here's a good video on the gasoline boat racing, lots of dunking. Boats capable of speeds up to 80 mph on the course depending on class. All running Zenoah 260 engines.

Impressive! I used to race smaller alcohol/nitro boats, 3.5cc and 7.5cc mono and hydros. Set a couple of straight-a-way NAMBA records. Electric was just beginning to make in on the scene when I gave it all up. We were there for the first (?) 1/8th mile officially clocked run over 100 mph (down and back) by an electric (NiCad) powered hydro. Everybody's jaw dropped. Surviving a dunking was just part of the sport.
 

Phaedrus

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Cool. I held a couple of straight line records as well. For 8S and 10S monos. 10S was 84 mph. That was a few years ago. Current T-mono record is 108!! T-hydro record is now over 144 mph!
 
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