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Yuneec's Typhoon H support is dead

rdonson

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I don't see how you can get through a science or engineering curriculum without being well versed in critical thinking skills even if it's just from a 2 year community college.

In the internet age there are a LOT of good online courses in critical thinking for free or for a very small fee.

Sadly the last couple of years of US politics has brought to my attention to the deficit of skills in this discipline.
 
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Isn't critical thinking part of the "Scientific Process?" You do your experiment and analyze, did it proceed as predicted/expected?
If not analyze until you reach a logical conclusion. If this does not yield a proper result run the experiment again until the conclusion matches and is supported by the data recorded.
It also requires that the data analysis be examined impartially and with no bias.
 

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Isn't critical thinking part of the "Scientific Process?" You do your experiment and analyze, did it proceed as predicted/expected?
If not analyze until you reach a logical conclusion. If this does not yield a proper result run the experiment again until the conclusion matches and is supported by the data recorded.
It also requires that the data analysis be examined impartially and with no bias.
Isn’t that a bit like running the same experiment over and over again hoping for a different result? Einstein made a profound statement describing those doing that. We run experiments to determine if the results verify expectations, proving or disproving calculations and assumptions, or to learn something we don’t already know. An experiment can only provide data matching an assumed conclusion if the assumed conclusion was correct to begin with.
 
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Isn’t that a bit like running the same experiment over and over again hoping for a different result? Einstein made a profound statement describing those doing that. We run experiments to determine if the results verify expectations, proving or disproving calculations and assumptions, or to learn something we don’t already know. An experiment can only provide data matching an assumed conclusion if the assumed conclusion was correct to begin with.
There are times when running an experiment again is warranted. Missed data points, unexpected failures of test equipment, etc.
The point is If you start wanting to find a particular result(Assumed) the data can be manipulated to prove just what you want.
To put it to in the light as I was taught in a course for Statistical analysis, "Figures don't lie, but liars can figure."
 

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The point is If you start wanting to find a particular result(Assumed) the data can be manipulated to prove just what you want.
To put it to in the light as I was taught in a course for Statistical analysis, "Figures don't lie, but liars can figure."
I've encountered a few engineers and business managers that were adept at manipulating data to support their position on things. They often ended up costing their company a lot of money, customers, and lost time.
 
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I know the types. One company that did some volunteer work for had a real Id10t engineer taking them down the path to bankruptcy. The companies goal was to make a less damaging tanning booth utilizing large flash tubes that would emit narrow band ultra violet light to tan the skin.
This engineer had designed a circuit board that had a buck/boost circuit on board. These circuit boards cost over $1000 each and each tanning booth required 12 of these circuit boards. Very problematic system with skipped periods of no light output and the occasional large capacitor explosions. The company owner asked me what I thought of the design. I told him it was excessively complex and that was the cause of all of the problems he was having. When I was asked to build a more usable design I said sure as far as that goes the design is already done.
I drew a schematic on the white erase board utilizing HV transformers, rectifiers, and industrial run/start capacitors. The simplified circuit gave more reliable and consistent light out put. Some engineers love to baffle people with smoke and mirrors.
 

rdonson

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Isn’t that a bit like running the same experiment over and over again hoping for a different result? Einstein made a profound statement describing those doing that. We run experiments to determine if the results verify expectations, proving or disproving calculations and assumptions, or to learn something we don’t already know. An experiment can only provide data matching an assumed conclusion if the assumed conclusion was correct to begin with.
If the experiments are simply repeats of the same setups without an expectation of there being another outcome then yes, that's insanity.

On going experiments with different parameters seeking to confirm the initial results or come to an different conclusion are quite the norm and may advance the science.

History shows that Newton had a very good grasp on gravity as long as the observations were confined to our solar system. Einstein hypothesized a different look at gravity with a larger view of the universe. Newton's work still holds up fine but it falls apart the more we head into the universe. People have been poking at Einstein's work for 100 years and have repeatedly confirmed what he hypothesized. That doesn't mean that someone won't come along and refine his work or come up with new theories. That's how science advances.
 
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I know the types. One company that did some volunteer work for had a real Id10t engineer taking them down the path to bankruptcy. The companies goal was to make a less damaging tanning booth utilizing large flash tubes that would emit narrow band ultra violet light to tan the skin.
This engineer had designed a circuit board that had a buck/boost circuit on board. These circuit boards cost over $1000 each and each tanning booth required 12 of these circuit boards. Very problematic system with skipped periods of no light output and the occasional large capacitor explosions. The company owner asked me what I thought of the design. I told him it was excessively complex and that was the cause of all of the problems he was having. When I was asked to build a more usable design I said sure as far as that goes the design is already done.
I drew a schematic on the white erase board utilizing HV transformers, rectifiers, and industrial run/start capacitors. The simplified circuit gave more reliable and consistent light out put. Some engineers love to baffle people with smoke and mirrors.
See it all the time myself if you know what PLC's are. A lot of the code now days could be cut in half..or more and do the same thing.
 
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I’ll jump in here and say I’ve had excellent service from Yuneec and I doubt they would end updates for the YH. I have a personal contact inside Yuneec who will know if this is true or not. I’ll report back. I doubt it is as the H+ is nearly identical in most ways and likely uses the same flight control systems, firmware and software (which are proven and reliable). But again, I’ll check with my source, who is reliable.
 

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There are times when running an experiment again is warranted. Missed data points, unexpected failures of test equipment, etc.
The point is If you start wanting to find a particular result(Assumed) the data can be manipulated to prove just what you want.
To put it to in the light as I was taught in a course for Statistical analysis, "Figures don't lie, but liars can figure."
I have a degree in Mathematics (Pure mathematics actually), among others, and my working background was in statistics. I remember, though, that when producing a report for management, myself and my co-workers went to great lengths to try and insure that those reports were without bias. My claim to...er...fame, was that I presented one particular report to the board that directly resulted in the company making several employees redundant. However, I presented the facts. The company had stock management issues and I made the management aware of those issues with cold hard unbiased figures and some people lost their jobs because of it. I'm not proud that those people lost their jobs, but I am proud that I presented the ugly truth.

Incidentally, it was shortly after this that I too was made redundant. Shot myself in the foot? Maybe, but they replaced me with a computer application. I spent the next 11 years working at a college in Manchester involved with the training of Human Resources professionals before retiring in 2014.
 
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The company had stock management issues and I made the management aware of those issues with cold hard unbiased figures and some people lost their jobs because of it. I'm not proud that those people lost their jobs, but I am proud that I presented the ugly truth.
Incidentally, it was shortly after this that I too was made redundant. Shot myself in the foot? Maybe, but they replaced me with a computer application. I spent the next 11 years working at a college in Manchester involved with the training of Human Resources professionals before retiring in 2014.
Quality Control is a suckers job. How many CEO's have ever been QC?
Well you might have shot yourself in the foot, but you did your job perfectly. I took over a job for an aircraft electronics manufacturing company as the head of Quality Control. The company was almost shut down the week I was hired, the FAA was there with padlocks in hand. I was blindsided by management as I had not been informed of the perilous situation with the FAA, nor informed of the impending forced closure. That was only one problem, the list was long. The technicians would power these devices up under what they called "Blast Boxes."
Heavy card board with aluminum foil glued to the inside. The units did blow up too frequently. I trained inspectors that did not have a clue about what they were looking at to read blueprints, to be competent and self assured.
I stopped the forced closure, negotiated down a horrendous fine, gained the tolerance of the FAA and improved the quality of the product. Five years later they laid me off because I had fixed their problems. Eight weeks later the company had padlocks on the doors. I did what I could but the arrogance of the companies officers angered the FAA. Of course they waited to lay me off after I had just purchased a new house in a desirable area.
 

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Quality Control is a suckers job. How many CEO's have ever been QC?
Well you might have shot yourself in the foot, but you did your job perfectly. I took over a job for an aircraft electronics manufacturing company as the head of Quality Control. The company was almost shut down the week I was hired, the FAA was there with padlocks in hand. I was blindsided by management as I had not been informed of the perilous situation with the FAA, nor informed of the impending forced closure. That was only one problem, the list was long. The technicians would power these devices up under what they called "Blast Boxes."
Heavy card board with aluminum foil glued to the inside. The units did blow up too frequently. I trained inspectors that did not have a clue about what they were looking at to read blueprints, to be competent and self assured.
I stopped the forced closure, negotiated down a horrendous fine, gained the tolerance of the FAA and improved the quality of the product. Five years later they laid me off because I had fixed their problems. Eight weeks later the company had padlocks on the doors. I did what I could but the arrogance of the companies officers angered the FAA. Of course they waited to lay me off after I had just purchased a new house in a desirable area.
Yep.Sound familiar to me too. That company that I worked for that laid off staff due to that report, and eventually laid me off too finally completely wound up less than 18 months later. Not mentioning any names but it was a major mail order group in the U.K. Me wonders whether that computer application that replaced me was all that it was cracked up to be.
 
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Yep.Sound familiar to me too. That company that I worked for that laid off staff due to that report, and eventually laid me off too finally completely wound up less than 18 months later. Not mentioning any names but it was a major mail order group in the U.K. Me wonders whether that computer application that replaced me was all that it was cracked up to be.
Management was cracked using an app to make their decisions.
 
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See it all the time myself if you know what PLC's are. A lot of the code now days could be cut in half..or more and do the same thing.
The same could be said about windows operating system. When windows did not exist DOS was king and there was a standard for programming. Programs had to fit into 640K of ram. They improved the processors and could handle large amounts of ram and then programming went down hill. They had to fill up all of this new found space with redundant code.
 
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I've encountered a few engineers and business managers that were adept at manipulating data to support their position on things. They often ended up costing their company a lot of money, customers, and lost time.
Like they say, if the facts don't support the theory, change the facts!



The very basics of the scientific method:
 
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FlushVision

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The same could be said about windows operating system. When windows did not exist DOS was king and there was a standard for programming. Programs had to fit into 640K of ram. They improved the processors and could handle large amounts of ram and then programming went down hill. They had to fill up all of this new found space with redundant code.
Like many people in my age group I came to computing in the very early 1980's and my first home computer was an Aquarius which had the stupendous 4k memory. Yes, that's right, 4K. Not 4m or 4 Gigs. Just 4k...half of which was taken up by operating code. Indeed, if my fading memory serves me right, that left me with around 1.75k of user memory. This meant that any programming I did had to fit into that 1.75k memory. BTW, the computer did not and could not use a disk drive or tape so when I switched it off, what I'd wrote had gone for good. Indeed, it was basically a toy. But using that machine I learned to be very concise with my algorithms.

Next home computer I had was a C64 which had, I think, around 42k user memory. It had a tape deck and also a 5.25 floppy disk drive (we're still in the early 1980's here). So a vast improvement on the memory and storage but I continued to be very concise with the programming so that in the several years I had it I never had shortness of memory issues. I still wrote most of my own stuff and learned the value of writing subroutines that could be called repeatedly from the base.

Then at around 1990 I got a PC running DOS. 640K RAM and, I think, a 30Mb HDD. With this machine I did a degree credit in computing-Programming & programming languages, and I also used it for getting my mathematics degree credit, all the while only ever using a fraction of its memory capabilities: That early 4K Aquarius had taught me well to be very concise.

I'm now using a 7 year old laptop with 8Gig RAM, an internal 1TB HDD, and an external 2TB HDD...and, I haven't scratched the surface with it with my own code. I need all that memory for my H480 video and lazy bloated code from commercial applications...applications which I'm sure could often be written using only a tenth of the memory if old school programming practices were followed.
 
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